Peace – The World Is Too Much With Us

Peace - The World Is Too Much With Us

Peace – The World Is Too Much With Us

A new year is upon us and the masses are already brimming with anticipatory ears for what is to inspire the listening palate. These last 12 months have been exciting and arduous but nonetheless unpredictable. From artists such as How To Dress Well and Frank Ocean to Tame Impala and Beach House (just to name a few) there was no lag in fan favorites who were no doubt positioned comfortably atop or at least a hint behind on many albums of the year charts. But this review isn’t focused on who is smattered on magazine covers, but the more behind the scenes “up and comer” if you will. Vancouver’s Peace is brazenly close to polishing their post-punk noise into a flawless gift to the guitar-driven music enthusiast. The World Is Too Much With Us is Peace’s newest full-length article with 8 brand new murky yelpers to add to the closet. Released in October of 2012, this recent Suicide Squeeze album is a definite maturation from Peace’s previous outing, although My Face was unique and dynamic in and of itself.

The opener on Peace’s newest full length is titled, “Your Hand In Mine” and unlike Texas instrumentalist champion, Explosions In The Sky, whose song title counterpart is much more dreamy and dynamic, the British Columbia quartet proffers subtle yet vibrant vintage ingenuities (and it’s catchy too). This track and many others showcase the brilliant instrumentation as the drummer and tri-axe men fulfill their stamina and talent quota to the highest degree and then some. Giddy punk beats via growly yet flowing guitar and bass lines tell us all we need to know about their musical outlook.

“I’m not making mistakes, they’re making me,” belts lead singer on the track, “Fun and Games.” Lyrically, a fantastic outing with poetic bouts and obvious heartache warrants a couple listens on each track to garner the emotion being emitted. At times, vocalist Dan Geddes unleashes a spoken word atmosphere while the darker; more baritone feature of his voice promotes the essence of the lyrics almost reminiscent of Paul Banks. Geddes however, leans heavily on reverb-esque qualities especially on the final cut, “Tattoo”. This track brings the unrelenting loopy guitar riffs playfully toying with the rhythm section as Geddes shows us his eerie but uncanny ability to usher power into the mix. A build up and redemptive finale bodes well for Peace as arrangement organizers who take utter care with their craft. An almost unrecognizable genre theme is apparent song-to-song but the post-punk vibe is pounding on the door trying to reign supreme only to be thwarted by the simple strengths of the instruments and Geddes melancholy. A bit mundane and unlistenable at times however, Peace finds small ways to bring the listener back which in my opinion speaks volumes (literally). Listen to this album loud and forget your preconceived post-punk notions while you rock out to The World Is Too Much With Us.

http://suicidesqueezerecords.tumblr.com/artists/peace

http://peacevancouver.bandcamp.com/