Conveyor – s/t

Conveyor - s/t

Conveyor – s/t

Migrating from the swamps and humid air of Florida to the bustling crowded elegance that is Brooklyn, New York is quite a stark contrast but was a necessary journey for the experimental pop quartet Conveyor. Recently signed to Paper Garden Records, Conveyor’s debut self-titled LP was released on Tuesday, July 17th. Borrowing from sounds mirroring bands such as Mice Parade or fellow Brooklyn experimenters Rubblebucket, there is a successful rhythmic ingenuity that is carefully crafted throughout the entire album. The tracks, “Homes”, “Short Hair” and “Mane” provide the electronic sensibility as well as the seasoned and well thought out rhythmic nature that takes shape through the vehicles of eerie vocals, dance-able guitars, subtle undertones with synth experimental sounds and the backing groove of the percussion. “Right Sleep” shows a banjo entering with a rim click rhythm, which gives the song a sound cognizant with the folk crowd sharing their ability to try new sonic avenues. This then transitions seamlessly into an instrumental outro, which introduces the electric guitar and the soft and dreamy qualities of a sound unlike when the song began.

There is a stunning musical imagery birthed by Conveyor. One that at times situates well with the indie crowd and then at other times is unrecognizable with a consistent genre. For me, there are positives and negatives to both of these accusations. For obvious reasons, there is a need for bands to have a clear direction as far as sound is concerned, to be able to gain credibility from an audience. On the other hand however, I believe that music is spontaneous and shouldn’t hold true to anything but what the artist portrays honestly in the moment. Conveyor is flowing upstream in a river of a dense and unconventional scene of experimenters and followers. For many artists a possession of unique qualities is the goal, but maybe there doesn’t need to be a goal, just music. At the end of the day, it is just about the music, and that is why I believe that Conveyor is the hypothetical soft breeze blowing on the dry heat of summer and a refreshing take on electronic experimental guitar pop. Vocally, there is a seasoned melodic atmosphere acting as a harp tinkering over the strings of the musical palate. My personal favorite track on the LP is “Mukraker” which displays an ambient nature hinged by the billowing vocals. It is absolutely beautiful. You will want to listen to this album at home the first time, drinking it its glorious eccentricity.

Listen to “Mukraker” and “Woolgatherer” for your first takes and then enjoy the album’s entirety. Pick up Conveyor’s self-titled debut on iTunes and Paper Garden Records today!