The Sewing Circle – I Saw Stars

The Sewing Circle – I Saw Stars

The support of success can definitely be some of the best chance to take. If past experiences have proven triumph then why not follow in the same path. For The Sewing Circle and their poppy rock affair of sounds the expedition of an album that reached a few good words caused them to take quick efforts in creating a follow-up, the dazed I Saw Stars. With no mention of an EP anywhere, the six-song collection unfortunately is a mixture of styles that end up leaving the listener disengaged and sometimes, definitely puzzled.

The brisk, 90s nostalgia that breeds into most of the songs is a recurring occurrence that always dates the music far more than it should. On something like “Love Games” the atmospheric blends of the swooning ocean and angular riffs recall that alternative shtick that certainly packs punch, while lacking charisma. Meg Blake’s voice is a sugary topping to the song’s tenacious vibe and her “I’m just crazy for you” lines are affectively delivered. Diversity is what they craft themselves on and while “Five Cigarettes” is more lingering thoughts (“I can’t wait to be a rock star”) the production of the music mutes most of the excitement from the band. Although there’s a gritty guitar solo, the drums sound wholly muffled and the bass is seemingly absent. There’s a growing bud of potential in the flower but a vigorous trimming at the edges seems entirely worthwhile too.

There’s a perceptible explosion on the album’s leading song, “Lead Role,” but mostly you get a crunchy guitar that beckons for a transfer to the modern era. At times the drums can barely be heard – especially on sections where fills are demanded attention – and in causing so, the music is left partially exposed to an unresolved escape. It’s like a great determined will that’s climbing up the mountain with the feeble support of sandals on his feet: the bottom won’t ever rise. In stark contrast, the closing song, “Until Now” leaves the band bulgingly supported by standby strings and a lax shaker; the album is mired with a sense of identity. They begin with a sordid connection of sorts and end with a scattered set of acoustic deliverance. Perhaps the confusion of the song’s ending, induced with a bewildered coda section that features a folk strum in weird fashion, is enough proof of the unrealized ideas capable for The Sewing Circle.

But through the identity crisis on this self-proclaimed LP, there are moments like the Celtic crash of “So As in Salem” that recognize a calming strength. If nothing else The Sewing Circle definitely pack energy on their music that defines their proven trust in each other and in their efforts. I Saw Stars might not be the kind of album to decorate as something special but for fans and likely additions, it’s positively an interesting experience.