The Damngivers – The Damngivers EP

The Damngivers – The Damngivers EP

The swaying nature of music is profuse in being able to control your passions and intentions with a delicate hand. For Long Beach’s The Damngivers, music finds an interesting equilibrium where leadman’s Gerry Gomez’ songwriting is able to fully digress around his band-mates country swoon. With the release of their self-titled five-song EP, the band is channeling a country rock that fittingly suits its frontman’s tongue-in-cheek demeanor. The aforementioned nature is one of The Damngivers’ best traits and part of the reason why their EP is a solid introduction to the band.

Hailing from California, the band relishes in a Southern-rock vibe that blends harmonica, banjo and guitar for a sound that while distinctly country, is never exaggerated. On “Lift Me Up,” Gomez sounds impassioned by the world spinning around him as he tries to instill some much needed life to the mundane grind. And while his voice sounds, strangely enough, like some kind of Franz Nicolay-Craig Finn fusion, there is a great spirit to the rolling tales he sings. “The Angler” offers up an abuser in the shape of a woman and how she manipulates her man’s every move. Playing the angle to whatever benefits her best, she’s always smiling behind the glean of a bluesy stomp. The band invigorates with a guitar twang that lightly supports Gomez’ depressive story; the blues is able to take many different forms nowadays.

On the driving force that is “Your Mouth Doesn’t Know What Your Mind Oughta,” The Damngivers ensure that their music is fervently felt. Rocking through a severe amount of stern advice from Gomez as the band rolls behind him; though Gomez offers some cheesy lines from time to time (“Just like the end of this song, my love will stop.”) It’s difficult to really place too much of an emphasis on songwriting that is only going to improve from here. The potential is definitely recognizable on a lot of gut-checked moments like the solemn stroll of “Stupid Things.” There’s no way of hiding the regret one feels when they say and do ‘stupid things,’ and still Gomez highlights that there is good in almost any situation. Like a Drive-By Truckers’ journey, the song chugs with a refreshing story that blends with its country swagger in just fashion.

And so for Gomez and Co. the passions one feels are always going to be the most strident, the most remembered and sometimes, the most deserving. Life is definitely filled with many opportune moments that surely, signify what we’re all striving to do: succeed. The Damngivers prove that you can fully attempt your dreams while still remembering about your honest roots and desires. Their EP is, if nothing more, a solid testament to hard-work and true grit and for that, you’d definitely say it was a success.