The Da Vincis – See You Tonight

The Da Vincis- See You Tonight

The Da Vincis- See You Tonight

Barely high school seniors from Mississippi, the members of The Da Vincis are quite remarkable from a background standpoint. It’s also pretty remarkable that they make such mature sounding music. These aren’t the sounds of teenagers hacking away at cheap guitars, but rather of a dusty, bossa nova group, with loads of piano, breezy synths,  jangly guitars, and soothing vocals. This a terrific accomplishment for a band of such a tender age, and if I were in the band, I’d probably have a copy of See You Tonight hanging around my neck at all times.

The music has a fantastic charm to it, always establishing a fun and loose vibe. Andrew Burke’s voice has a very distinct croon to it, similar to Zach Condon’s of Beirut, as he always is rolling off jazzy melodies. “Friend Request” is a song about exactly what the title implies, Facebook and accepting friend requests. Admittedly, the lyrics are too juvenile to be charming, but the instrumentation is worth the listen, and not because their teenagers, but because it’s genuinely good. Burke is, however, a classically trained pianist, so it shouldn’t be surprising that he excels at crafting these songs. No track’s instruments settle for being backdrops to Burke’s melodies, rather they become melodies of their own. Gavin Fields is a formidable sidekick to Burke, by offering a complement to his booming voice. They team up beautifully on “John Wayne” where Fields controls the track, as Burke peppers in his melody in between Fields’. “John Wayne” is a stomping, melodically driven song that is easily the album’s best, by taking all of the singular musicianship and colliding it with more melody and catchiness than every other song by a longshot. All of the supporting songs are only mild in their hooks, yet are still very nice listens, but it’s when “John Wayne” goes for broke on melody that things get really rewarding. “John Wayne” is an outstanding song for any band, and See You Tonight is definitely a good album age notwithstanding. As these teens grow and refine their songwriting (turn up the melody and drop the Facebook themes) they’re going to have something special ready to burst out.