Harris – The Light is Seeping Through the Cracks

Harris
The Light is Seeping Through the Cracks

The opening track on Harris’ debut album, The Light is Seeping Through the Cracks, is an accurate representation of the sound and style that dominate the LP. “Solid Ground” emphasizes Mike Nastri’s growls and flat vocals as loud guitars and pounding drums race with seemingly no rhyme or reason. It’s a formula repeated on other forgettable tracks with pointing titles, like “Last Sentiment,” “Worse Company,” and “Not What We Used to Be.”

On a positive note, there are a few moments on The Light is Seeping Through the Cracks when Harris teases listeners with a little melody, often driven by Jim Reed’s keyboards. On “Like Origami,” Reed’s playing recalls early post-punk, but his instrumental presence is drowned out by Nastri’s shouts. The captivating melancholy and gradually more intense loops of the completely instrumental “Some Kind of Gospel” make it the best track on the album. I’m not sure what drove Harris to compose as beautiful a piece as “Some Kind of Gospel,” but the band should consider committing itself to similar efforts.

“Too Young to Go” has a nostalgic early-90s British-rock approach, and Nastri’s vocals come off more passionately than on most other songs, but his inability to carry a tune can’t be hidden. Some people don’t mind that, yet mediocre singing isn’t the exception on The Light is Seeping Through the Cracks, it’s the general rule. Harris seems to possess the skills for writing catchy music, but it seems almost like there was a conscious effort to make The Light is Seeping Through the Cracks a more difficult listen than it could have been.