Daniel G. Harmann – The Lake Effect

Daniel G. Harmann
The Lake Effect

I think it’s fall. I think it’s sweater weather, even though its on the cusp of 70 degrees right now. I think its one of those days where I should lock myself in my room and gaze out the window at leaves falling from the trees. I listen to Daniel G. Harmann’s The Lake Effect, and I feel like being sad and rocking myself back and forth. These are all good things, as Harmann’s debut is intensely touching and sincere, and could be the new soundtrack to your sadness. If I chose to lock myself in my room, while on the verge of tears and muttering to myself, The Lake Effect would surely be playing in the background. It’s an album perfectly crafted for those moods. Not that this is bad, because we all have those moments, and the results can be therapeutic.
I’m not quite sure where Daniel G. Harmann came from, but he’s released an album of poignant bedroom rock. It’s thoughtful, sad, touching – but, perhaps most satisfying, it is good. It’s emotional and vulnerable without being over indulgent or whiny. Don’t get the wrong idea, you would be grossly mistaken to call this emo.
Touches of Red House Painter’s and Pedro the Lion enter Harmann’s soundscapes of sorrow, but his orchestrations are certainly fuller than those two. Though his primary weapon is an acoustic guitar, the sound is flushed out with vocal overdubs, strings, reverb, and other assorted atmospherics. This lush vibe and soaring melodies call to mind British shoegazers Ride almost instantly.
Though it’s full of melancholy, if you thought this might be a monotonous and unrelenting assault on your heartstrings you’d also be mistaken. There are some upbeat (though still sullen) numbers that move towards pop. “Broken Will, Bleeding Heart” is the would-be standout radio hit.
This album is good. After listening all the way through, you may feel the sorrow of a solitary autumn day, but you wont have the emptiness that goes along with it. Harrman’s music easily fills that void.